5 Things to Do If Special Education Personnel Refuse to Test Your Child For Eligibility

Do you have a child that you think might have dyslexia or another learning disability, and your school is refusing to test them for it? Are you concerned that your child may have autism or pervasive developmental disorder and your school district states that they will not test them? If your school district is refusing to conduct a comprehensive assessment on your child to determine special education eligibility, this article is for you. This article will discuss 5 things that you can do as a parent, if your school district is refusing to evaluate your child.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states under the Child Find section that: school districts are required to locate, identify and evaluate all children that may have a disability. Also someone transitioning from Early Intervention (birth-three years old), must be evaluated to determine if they are eligible for special education services. School districts are not allowed to depend on screening to determine eligibility for special education.

Here are 5 things you can do if your child is refused special education eligibility testing:

1. Gather your evidence together about their disability, and there need for special education services. Perhaps reports of your child’s disability, copies of state and district wide testing to show academic need, any documentation of emotional and behavioral difficulty, any evidence of social problems, and also any diagnosis that has been given by their Dr.

2. Take your child to get an Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE) with a qualified professional! You will have to pay for the evaluation, but you may be able to be reimbursed later. To find a good evaluator, ask other parents, or contact a local disability organization. Before you make the appointment make sure that the evaluator is not the present employee of any school district, is willing to do comprehensive evaluations in several areas, is willing to write a comprehensive report not only about testing but about what services your child needs. If the evaluator is a present employee of a school district, or waffles on specifically stating what services are needed, find a different evaluator! Getting copies of testing without specific recommendations is like paying for half an evaluation!

3. When the report is received (and your child has been found to have a disability and educational need) contact your school district in writing and send them a copy of the report. Ask that an eligibility conference be held again, since new information has now been received. School districts must consider any independent evaluations brought by parents.

4. Before the eligibility conference, try and find an experienced parent or an advocate to go with you to the meeting. The eligibility conference is the most important conference in special education. With the new information your child hopefully will be found eligible for special education (a child must have two things to be eligible for special education: a disability and educational needs). If the school district uses the information from the IEE ask for reimbursement.

5. If after all of this trying your child still is found not eligible, your only option may be to file for a due process hearing. This hearing is very formal and is heard in front of a hearing officer, not a judge. Try and find an experienced parent or advocate, to help you in this process.

Even if your child is found not eligible there are options available to you! Do not give up because your child is depending on you!

The Four Key Advantages Of Running A School Using Education Personnel Services

In the pursuit of providing the finest education, newly established schools could overlook the need for implementing good management policies that guarantee longevity in the business. Academic institutions, after all, are a business and not just places of learning so it’s crucial for any school to make management decisions that would be a financial benefit. One of the critical aspects of running any academic institution is managing personnel. Obtaining professional education personnel services has the potential to grow and maintain any school. Here now are four key advantages to acquiring professional assistance:

Specialists in education personnel can do recruitment and hiring using the highest standards. Every business relies on the quality of its workforce to determine its outputs and schools, in particular, need to hire only the best people. From screening for qualifications to vetting for suitability, education personnel specialists have the expertise and capabilities to get the best teachers, headteachers, administrators, and other essential staff. With education personnel specialists, schools save time and money on their recruitment process.

Specialists in school support services can provide a full suite of consultation services for personnel management. These might include headteacher support, early retirement and/or redundancies, staff audits, absence management, job evaluations and recommendations, reorganisation, pay and working conditions, and development of human resources policies. Essentially, the consultation services make it easy for any academic institution to focus on developing and implementing the curriculum while being assured that everything is running as smoothly as possible.

Specialists in education services can help the school staff to improve in how they perform their work by recommending the right type of training. From headteachers to administrators, every school personnel will acquire critical skills and knowledge in handling discipline and grievances, performance management, conducting investigations, and other concerns that apply.

Providers of education HR Services can help schools when legal issues need to be addressed. Whether it’s recognising recent amendments to the education system or handling conflicts regarding admissions, every school needs to be prepared well to resolve any legal matter. Some education support specialists can merely consult, but it would be preferable to have a firm that also has ties with law firms because this could help schools minimise on legal costs.

A school is a place of learning. But whether it’s a prep school or a university, it is still a business. It would be wise for any academic institution then to implement management policies and decisions that enable it to prosper as a commercial institution. And experts in personnel and school support can do just that.

3 Lies Told by Some Special Education Personnel About Autism and How You Can Fight Back!

Are you concerned that your young child may have autism even though you have you been told by special education personnel that he or she doesn’t? Would you like to know 3 of the lies told by many special education personnel about this disorder? Would you also like to learn advocacy strategies to overcome these lies? This article will address 3 of the most common lies told to parents about autism!

Lie 1: Your child does not have autism, they are emotionally disturbed! This is the most common lie that I see as an educational advocate. Most children with autism do have emotional and behavioral difficulty, but this is caused by the disorder. To truly be emotionally disturbed, the child cannot have any other disability causing the behavioral difficulty; which of course is not true in this case.

The reason that this is important is because if a child has autism, they will probably need extensive related and special education services, to benefit from their education. If the school district can convince you that your child does not have autism but is emotionally disturbed, they can try and deny all of the educational, services that your child needs.

You can advocate for your child by having them tested privately, with a psychologist specifically trained in this area. Bring these results to the school district and ask that your child be found eligible for special education under the category of autism; not emotionally disturbed (if the evaluation shows that this is true).

Lie 2: Your child does not have autism because they do not have the repetitive behavior that is a symptom of autism. I hear this a lot too, especially for children that have been diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) or Aspergers Syndrome. Many of these children do not have the typical features associated with this disorder. Over the years I have had many special education personnel tell me that a certain child did not have a certain disability; without testing them. The child needs to be given an autism rating scale by a qualified professional.

The one that I recommend is the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS). It is easy to fill out and to come up with a score. The higher the score is the greater chance that the child has the disorder.

There is also an Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) that can be given again by a qualified trained professional. Insist that your child receive an Autism Rating Scale (CARS), or the ADOS.

Lie 3: Okay so your child has autism; but they are not eligible for special education services because the autism does not affect their education.

The federal law governing special education is IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act). In 2004 the act was reauthorized, and the language stating that the child’s disability must negatively affect the child’s education, was taken out. It now states that for a child to be eligible for special education services, they must have a disability and have educational needs. No mention of disability negatively affecting the child’s education.

You should ask the special education personnel, to please show you in Federal Law where it states that special education eligibility, depends on the child’s disability negatively affecting their education. It does not exist and they will not be able to show you. As an advocacy technique keep repeating that it is your opinion that your child has autism and has educational needs. This is all that is required for a child to be found eligible.

You are the advocate for your child; stand up to special education personnel because your child is depending on you!